Category Archives: Sports

Super Bowl 38 In A Cowboy Bar

On Sunday, February 1, 2004, Danny Masters and I rolled into Ruidoso, New Mexico and stopped for a beer in what could only be described as a cowboy bar. I was probably the only one in the place not wearing cowboy boots and Wranglers. Even Danny was sporting a pair of boots, jeans, and a snap button western shirt. Adding to the cowboy image was a genuine king-size Marlboro dangling from his lips. The only clue he wasn’t a true son of the West was the one size fits all ball cap with KY embroidered on the front.
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Super Bowl I = A Stick & 5 Coat Hangers

On January 15, 1967, I was living in Downey, CA and the first Super Bowl was to be played in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The competing teams were the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs. The promoters were concerned about profits since a third of the coliseum seats remained unsold at prior to game time. With this and accepted policy that home games be blacked out in their home market the two broadcast networks, NBC and CBS, opted to keep with protocol and black out the Los Angeles area.

Since the closest broadcast stations were in San Diego a special beam antenna was needed to pull in the distant signals. A local rock station, KRLA, decided to fly in the face of big money and offered plans to construct an analog yagi beam antenna that could be built from a long stick, five metal coat hangers, a hand full of screws, and a sufficient length of TV ribbon cable.

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The Great California Potato Super Bowl

During the mid-1960s I was a student at Cerritos College in Norwalk, California. Cerritos had a football team called the Falcons and apparently, they were pretty good at the time. While I never attended one of their regular season games they did win a spot in a small college bowl game in Bakersfield called The Potato Bowl.

For whatever reason, several friends and I decided to make the drive. The Potato Bowl was played in a stadium that was literally a bowl dug into the earth and surrounded by bleacher seats.

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Cavalcade of Sports

This past Saturday I enjoyed a little deja vu. In the 1960s, on many a Friday night, I would watch Gillette’s Cavalcade of Sports, otherwise known as the Friday Night Fights. It was broadcast in black and white from Madison Square Garden in NYC and the ringmaster was the legendary Jimmy Lennon. You could sit in your living room and enjoy the best of the best that the sport of prizefighting could offer.

Archie Moore v. Rocky Marciano

I watched such legends as Ingemar Johansson, Floyd Patterson, Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, Emile Griffith, Archie Moore, Sonny Liston, George Foreman, Sugar Ray Robinson, and a young Cashis Clay. I was living in Downey, California and in the nearby community of Bellflower, a young Jerry Quarry was coming onto the scene in 1965. He would go on to become the world heavyweight champion and entering the ring with the biggest names of the day. Frank Stanley and I had the pleasure of seeing Quarry, in his early years, fight at the Olympic Auditorium in downtown Los Angeles.

Rubin “Hurricane” Carter

Those days are long gone but maybe, they’re coming back. Last Saturday I scanned onto a Fox sports channel and came across what appeared to be the Saturday Night Fights. I watched two championship 10-round bouts for middleweight and super middleweight. Of course, I didn’t recognize anyone but to my surprise and pleasure, the ringmaster was Jimmy Lennon, Jr. carrying on in his late father’s footsteps. Hopefully, this is regular programming and I can break out a Guinness and enjoy some pugilism on the occasional Saturday evening.

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A Bullet Ain’t Just a Bullet

Based on my assumption that there are less critics of a common and long existing .22 caliber semi-automatic rifle, like the one I gave my grandson, than of a .223 caliber semi-automatic rifle that has been labeled an “assault” rifle, I’ve been doing a lot of research on where the truth lies and so far it remains elusive.

L-R: 9mm round, .22LR cal round, .223 AR-15 round

Yesterday my son dug through his junk box and came up with a couple of different sample rounds, a 9mm  and a .223. I searched and found a .22 hollow point.  As you can see in the photo I took the 9mm projectile is quite larger than the other two but the case of the .223 is much larger. The diameter of the .22 and the .223 are almost identical with the .223 projectile being somewhat longer and more aero-dynamically shaped. The cartridge case of the .22 is miniscule compared to the two other rounds.

So, what’s all this mean? It means my grandson’s .22 semi-automatic shoots a bullet almost identical to the military .223 used in an AR-15. The target is getting hit by about the same amount of metal. The 9mm bullet, being larger, will cut a larger hole in the target. In addition to the bullet size is the amount of gunpowder in the cartridge case, the more powder the faster and further the bullet will travel. And when it arrives at the target less energy will have been spent and the potential for damage increases. If the target is an animal or human the bullet may begin to tumble as it enters the body which could multiply the damages. Distance would also be a factor. On the assumption that the 9mm would be shot from a pistol distance would have a major influence on bullet’s potential. Being fired from a rifle the bullet could travel further before losing it’s ability to be effective.  In this comparison the .223 reigns supreme because of its speed or velocity.

While there is no end to the science behind ballistics and to the debate over which is the best ammo round. The one truth I understand is that every bullet has the potential to kill. Oh, and that includes a BB, “it will take your eye out!”

Lance

ARMSTRONG: “A federal judge refused to throw out the U.S. government’s $100 million lawsuit against Lance Armstrong, meaning that the former cyclist will be going to court. Armstrong is being sued under the False Claims Act over his use of performance-enhancing drugs, which the government claims violated his contract with the Postal Service.”

538 on the OSU Buckeyes

FiveThirtyEight doesn’t just do political stats. It’s owned by ESPN and is in the sports prediction business as well as politics. Here’s what they’ve got to say about the future of the Buckeyes.

In what may be the biggest college football rivalry game of the year, No. 2 Ohio State beat No. 3 Michigan in double overtime, 30 to 27. Last week, Ohio State had a 61 percent chance of making the College Football Playoff and Michigan had a 37 percent shot, according to FiveThirtyEight’s college football predictions. Ohio is now a 90 percent chance of making the playoff, and Michigan’s chances are down to 2 percent. I went to William & Mary, not exactly a big time football school, but as I understand it the College Football Playoff is a recent innovation that decides who gets to eventually lose to Alabama on national television.

Hope they do better with OSU than they did with Hillary!